nice doggie

Group pics from Banff

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Well I can see its going to be a week of dog references, puns, and plays with word. fun. After some close calls this morning with sleeping, last minute packing, and scrounging for cab fare, i made it on the plane. The blogsndogs conference has collided head on with the xmas party season, and the results were nearly a disaster. But im in the house, snug as a bug.

I am going over some of the main links we will be using to document this event flickr, delicious, technorati, (which is where you should be looking for complete coverage of the events), and see the faculty are already getting started on ODEO. This feels a little like getting strapped into ‘the drop of doom‘ at west edmonton mall, which is one of my more vivid memories of this province. We are meetin and greetin in about an hour, better go get my snack before hand. I wonder if there will be any early birds hanging around in the pub?

Fired for blogging

The reason I started my blog in the first place was as a form of therapy.

updated:December 29, 2004 at 11:29 AM

from the The Papal Bull

A much more extensive list of
bloggers that have been fired.

December 16, 2004, 4:00 AM PT By Ellen Simonetti c/net A companion piece to my earlier Hired for blogging story… that was not mine. I like the balanced playing field being exposed here. The blogging steamroller has both its ups and downs apparently, which I am thinking cancel each other out.

This most recent example, again emphasizes the fact that the web is not as free and open as some would have us believe. In fact it seems to be pushing us closer towards a Big Brother future even as it seems to move us away from that possibility.

Jeremy Zawodny had pointed to an earlier instance of a now famous story of a Friendster employee being fired for their blog. Some good links there.

Check out the full article below or here.
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Extreme Blogging

Passively browsing the Web may be a thing of the past. New technologies are taking collaborative Web spaces to the next level.

by Matt Rand, 12.15.04
Forbes

Blogs are so last year. The next big thing, according to Web junkies, is the “wiki.” What are wikis? They are Web sites that are open for editing by anyone with a browser, without any fancy applications or programming skills necessary. Think a reference Web site on the history of Vietnam is biased? Scrub it clean. Think a documented procedure on your company’s Web site is out of date and needlessly inefficient? Rewrite it.

Think of it as an evolution. In the early days of the Web, there were bulletin boards like Usenet. Then, during the boom, Web sites like Geocities (now owned by Yahoo (nasdaq: YHOO – news – people )), which gave people the ability to create communities of templated personal Web pages. Post-Internet bubble, Web logs offered “bloggers” more customizable personal Web journals and the ability to invite controlled collaboration. Wikis are the next generation: Web spaces that are totally collaborative.

Wikis are being brought to you by the same type of programmers who created Linux, the open-source operating system now competing in the corporate server market with Microsoft’s Windows Server and Sun’s Solaris. Wikis’ idealistic developers believe that these “open to all” Web sites could eventually be a solution to much of what ails the Internet?the spam, the promotions disguised as content, and an ever-present problem with anything published in cyberspace, credibility. It is essentially the belief that might will make things right on the Web. By allowing anyone to change a Web-published document, the thinking goes, those documents then have to withstand the scrutiny of the red-pen-holding masses.
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