Drawn to Comics: An instructional outline

I had the chance last week to work with one of the SFU Educational Consultants on presenting an introduction to pedagogy for a group of Communications grad students. We took the opportunity to get out of our comfort zone.  I was lucky to work with the talented Sarah Turner, from our Teaching centre and designed an educational development mashup of sorts, combining the best of pedagogical practice with drawing and comic book design.

I guess word has been getting our around on campus as I have been pushing my going visual workshops, and offering them “on demand” for grad students and various class drop in sessions. These are typically focussed on the particulars of drawing in an educational context, and there are many directions the conversations go. For this session I was approached to do the same, but our audience in this case a young group of emergent PHD students, all of which needed ideas on how to incorporate these activities into their teaching and learning, and use them in a pedagogically sound manner.

For this workshop we wanted to go a step further than the regular Going Visual syllabus and incorporate some actual technology into the mix, that being an ipad and Comic Book app.  We borrowed this idea from another great mentor of mine, Dr. Jessica Motherwell and colleague from the JIBC Krista Lambert in a presentation they did at the Sketching in Practice Symposium this year called “Using Comics to rehearse best practices“.  Jessicas resources are openly shared and she encourages this kind of appropriation. And I really wanted to make the outline of our session in a comic book form!

I’m quite pleased with the way it turned out, and will be looking to do similar projects using this technique. It gave a chance to build a story around our session as well as convey the basic topics we were planning to cover.

Bad Moon Rising

wolf
Animation study. Slow transition 5 frames. Wolfman
jackie
Animation study. Slow transition 5 frames. Jackie

I see it.

There are many back-logged posts and sketches to get out, (remember #inktober ?!) but tonight, I’m motivated share these early animation studies I drew back in my college days. These have been part of a collection of old drawings I have been hanging onto since I made them, but in an ongoing effort to decrease my worldly possessions they are on deck for destruction. I’ve taken it upon myself as I’m culling my final portfolios, to digitize and blog these artifacts to somehow ensure they have more longevity than the paper and ink they were rendered on. We’ll see how that goes.

The study here, if I remember correctly was simply to show some action, over 5 frames. These were to be rendered in ink, in a 3×4 format, and turned in on a clean card stock, with no eraser lines, no torn edges and no coffee stains. It was about telling a compelling story in combination with meticulous craftsmanship. And now they are animated GIFs.

My energy over the next couple of weeks is turning to both Halloween, drawing, and much more, which in part have inspired this post. I hope to share more drawings here, as I pick up on #inktober, and further ‘art decluttering’. There is no space for fear, as much as conditions may call for it, best to just dive in.

 

 

Scary stories of Second Life, circa 2007

Well this is happening.

The Little (work)Shop of Horrors, is coming up October 28th, and I am STOKED about what the planning team and our Centre for Digital Media (CDM) collaborators have been able to put together in such a short period of time.  Of particular note, are the keynote and plenary speakers. Audrey Watters will be kicking things off with some scary stories of her own all related to the monsters in educational technology. Closing our day will be CDM resident Patrick Pennefather, who promises some highly interactive experiences which will build from the rubble of our experiments and failures.

Which brings me to the theme and the idea behind “fail tales”, or sharing stories when things did not go well. A few years ago I attended one of the annual “Failure Wakes” held by the RADIUS Innovation lab, and was struck by the openness of the contributors, and how these innovators embraced their failures as “..fertile soil in which new ventures grow.” When the topic came up as a possible theme for the EdTech communities fall workshop, I was in full support. “What could go wrong?!” Well for some reason I couldn’t get behind asking others to share instances that may put themselves, in a vulnerable position. Unless I was ready to do so myself! In the spirit of camaraderie and the notion that our failures are the key to growth, I have decided to shere one of the worst EdTech fails I can think of in my relatively lengthly career in this area. I’ll let the video speak for itself, but a huge shout out to Duane Woods for putting this together so quick and off the cuff.

Look forward to seeing you on October 28th!